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The perfect gift for this Christmas? A dog photography session!

Today I'm bringing you this beautiful little beast called Wembley. He is an adorable white French Bulldog able to melt your heart instantly.

Normally, all my sessions are planned with weeks in advance. But this tuesday I got a call from a woman who wanted to gift her sister with a dog photography session for the next day! Turns out, that her sister got a puppy and that she is also pregnant and she is due next week! She didn't want to wait.

pregnancy-photography-with-dog-puppy.jpg

She also told me that when they were kids, they were raised with a Rottweiler. Unfortunately -and I see this very often- the years passed and the dog passed away. Her family still regrets  not having good pictures of him. Of course, she didn't want this to happen again and she saw the opportunity to celebrate this double arrival by buying FRAME YOUR PET'S Gift Card  for Wembley (you can buy yours here).

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The session was amazing! Here are the some photos from the session. Which one is your favorite? (I like them all!)

Doesn't remind you of Stitch from "Lilo & Stitch"? 

Doesn't remind you of Stitch from "Lilo & Stitch"? 

best-gift-ideas-for-christmas-2014

Would you like to have a session like this for your dog or cat? Then contact me to schedule your session consultation.

Or if you prefer, buy your Gift Certificate hereNo expiration date. Instant download & 100% Risk-Free. Money-Back Guarantee. 
 


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7 Reasons Why You Should Hire a Professional Pet Photographer

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7 Reasons Why You Should Hire a Professional Pet Photographer

It’s convenient to snap pictures of your furry friends with your camera or smartphone when a cute or playful moment presents itself, but those aren’t the photos that you’re going to want to print and frame. For display, you’ll want professional pet photos that are done with taste and grace.


Here are some the reasons that make professional pet photography a worthwhile investment:


1. The puppy stage is very short

We all melt when looking at photos of puppies. It's the sweetest thing ever and we all wish we could have a puppy again. You may have had a puppy once, but you barely remember it because the puppy grows so fast! Who doesn't like to search for puppy photos? The beautiful pictures of little and clumsy animals, sleeping or playing, with great light, keeping all the details and the softness. High end photography is hard to achieve with iPhones and those types of photos don't do justice to your dog at all.

Those playful, cuddly puppies will grow up fast. You’ll want to capture this moment so that you will be able to remember it when your friend becomes an adult and eventually a senior. This is the sweetest and most innocent phase of your pet’s life, and before you realize it, it will be gone. So the sooner you immortalize it in photography, the better.

Boxer puppy with her mom during his puppy session with Frame Your Pet Photography.

Boxer puppy with her mom during his puppy session with Frame Your Pet Photography.

2. Animals don’t last forever

I wish they did, but they will die some day and then what will you have? 1000 photos in your Dropbox all with bad lighting and resolution enough for an 8x10. Many of my clients are booking what I call Rainbow Sessions. It’s for pets who are nearing the end of life either due to old age or an illness. It’s great to get those photo opportunities in before it’s too late, but why not get a new photo shoot done with them every couple of years, when they’re still strong and healthy, so that when they do pass, you’ll have something to illustrate their whole life.

Saying goodbye to your companion is never easy. So before it’s too late, this is a wonderful way to capture those last precious moments

Saying goodbye to your companion is never easy. So before it’s too late, this is a wonderful way to capture those last precious moments


3. Your pet is part of your family

We all take professional pictures with our spouses or families. Why not honor your beloved pet with a quality photo shoot as well? Pet photography also has the ability to be more artistic in lighting and backdrops than family portraits. Imagine the action shots, the cute poses and expressions framed perfectly on your wall. Family portraits, when displayed, tend to be no larger than 8x10, but an artistic pet photo can look great at larger proportions.

Cooper's family gave themselves a gift with beautiful family portraits in their home.

Cooper's family gave themselves a gift with beautiful family portraits in their home.


4. Pet photography done tastefully can become a piece of art

This isn’t stock photos or store-bought décor. This is unique and personalized art. Photos of animals make great pieces of art. But instead of spending thousands of dollars on a photo of a horse or dog you don't know, now you have the chance to have your own custom made piece of art of your cat or dog.

As an artist and photographer, I understand your needs for such art and that's why I created my Fine Art Sessions, which are meant to serve as large gallery mounted prints worthy of display. My photos are elegant, striking images that you will feel proud to have in your home.

Visit my  Wall Art galler  y  to see more examples on how I can turn your cat, dog or horse photos into a masterpiece.

Visit my Wall Art gallery to see more examples on how I can turn your cat, dog or horse photos into a masterpiece.

 

5. Photography takes skill

You might take some great photos, but they still won’t have the professional touch to them. A career pet photographer has the training, the equipment, the experience, materials, and supplies to produce a gallery-quality portrait. The professional pet photographer will not only provide you with images that you never thought possible, but will shoot thinking about colors and composition. Also, the professional lenses are able to capture the light and details that no point and shoot camera or iPhone can. Plus, a skilled pet photographer will take care of fine tuning the image: removing eye bugs, removing the leash from the photo, removing people in the background, enhancing the fur details, the colors, etc.

To create a more piece of art more than just a quick shoot of the moment, the photo needs that fine tuning that only a professional pet photographer can provide.

BEFORE
This photo was taken with an iPhone.

AFTER
Akame's mom bought a Fine Art Session with Frame Your Pet and this is one of the photos of their session. They actually decided to print and mount this one on 24x36 aluminum piece. 

Related article: Why custom pet photography is expensive

 

6. Memories are priceless

Pet photography is a bit of a luxury, but once you capture those moments with your friend, you’ll have them forever and will have no doubt of their worth. We all return to photos from time to time when we feel nostalgic: photos of when we were kids, when we had that trip to the Grand Canyon with all the family, the Christmas evening when Grandpa was still with us, our wedding day. Photos immortalize that moment in time, that split second that will no longer be with us. Only the photo is the proof that that day existed and we lived it. So memories are not only priceless; they tell the story of our life. And cats and dogs are our life too. They grow up with us, they share every day with us and our kids, so it's very important to have their presence in our lives documented. This is especially true when you don't have children, as many do not. Pets are very much our family, and family in any form is a treasure.

Shino turned 17 years old and his family decided to celebrate it with a professional pet photography session to capture his personality before it was too late.

Shino turned 17 years old and his family decided to celebrate it with a professional pet photography session to capture his personality before it was too late.


7. If you are a pet business, you need high quality marketing material

The quality of your marketing speaks volumes about the quality of your products or services. Look at any company and you’ll see that their sales increase in direct correlation to their marketing budget. The more you advertise, and the better your advertising is, the more customers will notice you and entrust you with their business. If you want your business to grow and see an increase in customers or client, taking your advertising and display materials to the next level with customized, professional pet photography is going to be key.

A Spanish Horse Breeder and Horse Club commissioned Frame Your Pet a series of Fine Art equine photography to illustrate their high-end service. The photos are being use for their website and marketing activities such as brochures, printed ad's, posters etc.

A Spanish Horse Breeder and Horse Club commissioned Frame Your Pet a series of Fine Art equine photography to illustrate their high-end service.
The photos are being use for their website and marketing activities such as brochures, printed ad's, posters etc.

CONCLUSION

Of course, you’ll still want to take your own photos when the right moment strikes, but for the purpose of creating art and important keepsakes, only a professional pet photographer can deliver the quality you desire. Take the time to schedule your photo shoot today!

 

Related articles: Tips to choose the right pet photographerHow good dog and equine photography can help boost your business.


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If You Don’t Adopt, You’re a MONSTER - Adopting vs. Buying a Puppy.

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If You Don’t Adopt, You’re a MONSTER - Adopting vs. Buying a Puppy.

There are many animals, including puppies, that are destroyed and abused every year for different reasons. As a result of this, rescue and adoption centers have been established so as to save the lives of some of these animals. Of course, you can’t always find your preferred breed in a shelter or rescue agency, so what should you do?


 

Arguments for Adoption

The greatest debate when selecting a new furry family member is whether to adopt from a shelter or rescue organization, or to buy one from a breeder. Different people have different opinions on this topic, but from a general perspective, people argue that adopting a puppy is one way of rescuing it from certain death, unlike buying.

 

It is very unfortunate that approximately 4 million unrescued puppies are euthanized every year in the US due to overpopulation in shelters. Adopting a dog or cat therefore means that you will have rescued the life of that particular animal. Because of this, you will be considered a hero rather than a monster as people sometimes refer to those who buy specially bred animals.

I always wanted to have a Pug or a French Bulldog. But when the time arrived, I couldn't help myself to adopt Riff. After checking 10 different shelters and meet with 5 different dogs, Riff was the one. I couldn't resist to his positive energy. He was the perfect match for me and I've never been happier with this little crazy, yet lovely, chihuahua-terrier mix!

I always wanted to have a Pug or a French Bulldog. But when the time arrived, I couldn't help myself to adopt Riff. After checking 10 different shelters and meet with 5 different dogs, Riff was the one. I couldn't resist to his positive energy. He was the perfect match for me and I've never been happier with this little crazy, yet lovely, chihuahua-terrier mix!

There have been a lot of misconceptions about animal adoption. For example, some people having been saying that puppies in shelters are those who did not make good pets. This is not true because the main reasons that people give up pets that end up in shelters include: they have allergies, the owner dies or no longer has time for the pet, the owner is moving to a home that does not allow pets, the owner is no longer able to afford the pet costs, etc.

 

The top reasons to adopt:

  1. You are saving a life
  2. You can get an adult dog rather than a puppy if you want a more relaxed animal
  3. The shelter or agency staff knows the animal’s personality and health issues, so they’ll be able to inform about any issues the animal may have
  4. You can visit with the animal, get to know its personality, and even take it home for a fully refundable trial period to determine if it is a good fit your home and family
  5. The animal has been cared for and brought up to health by the shelter/agency
  6. You can search for specific breeds you might be partial to
  7. Most shelter/rescue animals are of mixed breed, which decreases their chances of having or developing chronic health problems normally associated with purebred animals.
  8. If your circumstances change, and you can’t keep the animal, you can return it to the shelter or agency without incurring any associated fees
  9. Whereas there is some cost in adopting a pet, it is much more affordable to pay the $200 or lower adoption fee than the up to $3000 breeding fee (price is just approximate)
  10. The shelter or agency will do everything they can to assist you in the adoption process, and if you have any problems with the animal after you adopt it, they’ll even provide support to help with those issues too

 

Remember that saving money is not the only reason to adopt a pet versus buying one. Whereas adoptions generally do cost less initially, every animal needs regular veterinary care and to have its basic needs provided. Adopting isn’t as much about saving money as it about saving a life.


 

Arguments for Buying from a Breeder

Some people have a hard time not understanding why people buy puppies from breeders instead of adopting. However, all decisions, when made with solid reasons and according to one’s own need, must be respected.

Before we list the potential benefits of buying from a breeder, we must note the need to carefully select your breeder. There are some things that go on in puppy mills that are not good for the health of animals themselves. Nearly all “puppy mills” are large-scale breeding places where owners are after making large profits from the animals they sell. As a result of this, female dogs are forced to breed continuously until they can’t breed any longer. These female dogs do not have the freedom to live as normal dogs and their offspring are a result of over breeding, which, while creating beautiful animals, also causes serious health issues in their genetic makeup.

 

Not all breeders are like this. You can certainly find dog and other animal breeders who care for their animals, treat them well, track their lineage, and pair them in such a way as to ensure maximum genetic variety within the breed itself.

 

The top reasons to buy from a breeder:

  1. You are guaranteed the breed that you desire and can verify each animals’ lineage

  2. You can establish a relationship with the breeder and his/her practices

  3. The breeder will offer you references of dog owners who are happy with the dogs they purchased

  4. You will know what type of temperament and health concerns to expect from your animal

  5. You will be able to fulfill your dream of having a certain breed

  6. A breeder will be available to you throughout your dog’s life

  7. There is endless information on your specific breed

 

As you can see, there are good reasons to adopt from a shelter or association and there are good reasons to buy from a reputed breeder. It is a personal decision for each pet owner, and you can be sure that no matter how you acquire your new family member, the love that you give to, and receive from it, will remain the same.

 

Related link: How to choose the right breeder.


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How to choose for the right breeder

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How to choose for the right breeder

We all have our favorite breeds of dogs. The question is how to find the right breeder for your chosen breed. You want a responsible breeder who cares properly for their animals and conducts business in an ethical, human manner. You also want a breeder that will answer your questions openly and honestly.

 

Before Going to the Breeder...

Check your local shelter. One in every four dogs in animal shelters in the United States is purebred, so if you’re looking for a certain breed, chances are high that you’ll be able find the dog you’re looking for in a shelter or rescue agency at a much lower price than if you had gone to a breeder directly. You'll also feel great about helping a homeless dog find a loving home. Most dogs lose their homes because of "people" reasons, such as cost, lack of time, lifestyle changes (new baby, divorce, moving, or marriage), or allergies, and not because of the dog’s behavior or personality.

Set is a Long Hair Collie (purebred) that was rescued from a puppy mill. After tons of love and patience, he made full recovery and he is a balanced and wonderful dog. Click  here  to know more about Set.

Set is a Long Hair Collie (purebred) that was rescued from a puppy mill.
After tons of love and patience, he made full recovery and he is a balanced and wonderful dog.
Click here to know more about Set.

If you've searched the online shelter and rescue listings for your breed, but still haven't found what you’re looking for, it’s time to find an ethical breeder. You don't want to buy a puppy from a pet store because you know that most of those puppies come from mass breeding facilities—better known as puppy mills. You'll want to find a breeder who has their dogs' best interests at heart.

(Photo/Klearchos Kapoutsis via Flickr)  This is the most "normal" picture I could find while looking for references. The cruelty of the images were too much to post them in this article. If you want to see the truth behind the puppy mills, just search for "puppy mills" in Google Images.  Viewer discretion is advised.    

(Photo/Klearchos Kapoutsis via Flickr)
This is the most "normal" picture I could find while looking for references. The cruelty of the images were too much to post them in this article. If you want to see the truth behind the puppy mills, just search for "puppy mills" in Google Images. Viewer discretion is advised.

 

Choosing a Responsible Breeder

Everyone always tells you to buy a puppy from a "reputable breeder". That’s sound advice, but how do you find one? How do you tell a reputable breeder from an unethical or irresponsible one?

 

I've collected a listing of questions that you should ask a breeder to help you determine if they are going to be a good source for your puppy. Remember, too, that the breeder is evaluating you, as well, and will undoubtedly ask you some questions. But we’ll talk about this in another post.

 

You can find responsible breeders by asking for referrals from your veterinarian or trusted friends, by contacting local breed clubs, or visiting professional dog shows. Remember, a responsible breeder will never sell their dogs through a pet store or in any other way that does not allow her to meet with and thoroughly interview you to ensure that the puppy is a good match for your family and that you will provide a responsible, lifelong home.

 

 

Talk to the Breeder (The Most Important Step)

Often, you can get a quick impression by taking a look at the breeder's home or place of business, or by chatting with the breeder. If by some chance, the breeder seems cagey or does not want to give you a tour of the place, you should probably steer clear. Someone with nothing to hide will gladly talk to you or show you around. A breeder who interviews you to make sure you can provide a good home is another good sign of a qualified breeder.

 

They should be well educated about the breed they work with, and be honest about the pros and cons of the breed. A responsible breeder will be a member of a national and possibly regional breed club affiliated with (in the United States) the American Kennel Club (AKC) or United Kennel Club (UKC); and the breeder's dogs will be AKC and/or UKC registered; and the litter registered as well, with the the puppies eligible for (if AKC) Full or Limited Registration as well.

 

9 Questions to Ask Your Breeder

1. How long have you bred this species? Have you ever bred others? (You want someone who has experience in your chosen or similar breed. You also want a specialist for your breed, not someone who breeds many different species.)

 

2. What are the most common genetic health issues with this breed? How does your breeding practice seek to minimize those issues? (Look for honest answers about the issues and someone who is taking real measures to ensure genetic variety within the breed. Do a little research first so that you know what the issues are yourself.)

 

3. Are the parent animals available for me to meet? (Most breeders should not own both parent animals. To ensure variety, they will most likely own the female but not the male. If they do not let you see the female, that may be an indication that their dogs are not healthy or well kept.)

 

4. Can you tell me about the parent animals? (Every animal has good and bad points, so look for a balanced answer from your breeder and pay special attention to the parent animals’ disposition toward people or other animals to ensure that your new puppy will not have an overly aggressive personality. Also note if the parent dogs have been in dog shows or certified as Companion Dogs.)

 

5. What is this puppy’s pedigree? (You’re looking for a knowledgeable breeder who can trace the animal’s lineage to at least four generations. Look for honesty when it comes to interbreeding.)

 

6. Are you raising the puppies here? Have they been socialized? (Ideally, your prospective puppy will have been raised in the household so that they will be used to people and being in a home rather than a kennel where they will have limited human interaction.)

 

7. How many litters do you have per year? (If they are breeding any one female more than once a year, this is too often to ensure the healthiest littler possible. If they have too many litters per year, this is a good indication that they are not properly planning for good breeding.)

 

8. What guarantees do you offer for this puppy? (They should guarantee against debilitating genetic conditions, ensure good health at the point of sale, and be willing to take returned animals. Part of being an ethical breeder is making sure that the puppies have a good home and that it stays that way.)

 

9. When can I take the puppy home with me? (Puppies can normally leave their mother when they are 2-3 months old. Avoid someone who offers them earlier as this demonstrates irresponsibility to the animal’s health and natural development.)

 

You’ll also want the breeder to let you play with and interact with the puppy to see if you like its personality.

Good luck on finding the right animal for you and your family!

 

Download the "How to Identify a Responsible Dog Breeder" [PDF] checklist from the Humane Society and take it with you as you visit different breeders. 

Read “What a Dog Breeder Won’t Tell You” for more information.


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